2006

APOCALYPSE TAPESTRY

Château d’Angers, Maine et Loire (49)

    indexed

    historic monument

    client

    Ministère de la Culture – Direction De Patrimoine – Drac Pays De La Loire

    project management

    GMDP architecture

    project management mission

    Mandataire – mission complète – conception et réalisation

    surface

    2,100 m²

    cost of the works

    € 6 M excl. VAT

    Handed over to the Historic Monuments Department in 1947 by the army, the château was subject to a series of restoration and development campaigns that saw the return of the Apocalypse Tapestry to the Angers château in 1953 and its presentation in a new building designed the chief Historic Monuments architect, Bernard Vitry. The building is laid out in an L-shape that runs alongside the south and east sides of the Seigniorial Court.
    Following over 40 years of display to the public, the conservation conditions of this exceptional 106 metre long work of art dating back to 1373 had proven themselves insufficient. An alarming level of deterioration of the colours led to the gallery being closed.
    The remedial works concerned:
    – the restoration of the Vitry gallery and its refitting, as well as a complete reorganisation of the hanging system, lighting, hygrometry and cleanness of the air, as defined by contemporary museographical criteria,
    – the restoration of the medieval buildings located within the plan area of the Counts of Anjou palace and their opening to the public,
    – the creation of a vast underground volume below the Royal Lodge and on the same level as the Vitry gallery. This permitted the completion of circular visit route around the quadrilateral courtyard. The construction of this underground room resulted in the installation of a specific reception area for visiting the Tapestry, accompanied by lobbies that allowing visitors to become accustomed to the light level while also extracting dust from the ambient air. The Tapestry maintenance workshops, as well as comfort features and educational amenities have been made accessible to people with reduced mobility.